Teenager Immunizations

Once children reach their teenage years, it’s easy to overlook their vaccination needs. The National Immunisation Program recommends the following vaccinations for this age group; Diptheria, Tetanus, Whooping Cough, Pneumococcal Disease and seasonal Flu.

Immunity from some childhood vaccines can decrease over time, and a booster dose may be recommended during the adolescent years to maintain immunity. As children move into adolescence and approach adulthood, some people are at greater risk of catching certain infections.

If your child has not received all recommended vaccinations to date, catch up doses may also be necessary. See full details here. 

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a serious and potentially life-threatening liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. The virus is spread through contact with blood or other body fluids of an infected person.

Hepatitis B vaccination is recommended for adolescents 10 to 13 years of age who have not already received a primary course of hepatitis B vaccination.

Hepatitis B vaccination is also recommended and provided free to children as part of the National Immunisation Program.  It is provided as 4 injections: one at birth followed by another 3 doses given at 2, 4 and either 6 or 12 months.

Chicken Pox or Varicella

Varicella, commonly known as chicken pox, is a highly contagious infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus. It presents as red, itchy blisters all over the body.

Varicella vaccination is provided free to children aged 10 to 13 years who do not have a history of chickenpox or have not been vaccinated.

Vaccination of children less than 14 years of age involves a single vaccine dose.

Human Papillomavirus

Infection with certain types of a common virus called the human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause a number of conditions in the genital region, including cervical cancer.

HPV vaccination is recommended for females aged 10-13 years of age and is provided free to 12-13 year old girls in their first year of secondary school as part of the National Immunisation Program (NIP). Parents are required to give their consent to vaccination.

As genital HPV is most commonly spread by sexual contact, funded vaccination is available to females before they become sexually active to  help prevent initial infection with the HPV types included in the vaccine.

HPV vaccination involves 3 injections, usually given over a 6-month period.   It is important that all three injections are received to help protect against HPV infection.

Genital Warts

Genital warts usually appear as a small bump or groups of bumps in the genital area.  They can be different sizes, raised or flat, or shaped like a cauliflower. Genital warts can affect both males and females.

HPV vaccination is recommended to provide protection against cervical disease. However, the current HPV vaccine used for the government funded school program for 12-13 year old girls also provides some protection against genital warts.

As HPV is most commonly spread by sexual contact, funded vaccination is given to females before they become sexually active to help prevent initial infection with the HPV types included in the vaccine.

HPV vaccination involves 3 injections, usually given over a 6-month period.   It is important that all three injections are received to help protect against HPV infection.

Males are also at risk of HPV infection. Vaccination against HPV is not currently government funded for males. HPV vaccination for adolescent males is available as a private script.

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